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Past Seminars

October 25, 2019

  Title  Peebles’ Universe - the science that won a Nobel
  Speaker Dr Sanjeev Kalita, Physics Department, GU
  TypeInformative
  DateFriday, 25 October, 2019
  Time2:30 PM
  VenuePhysics Gallery, GU


Abstract

The Nobel Prize in Physics 2019 has been awarded to Phillip James Edwin Peebles (Jim), Albert Einstein professor of Science, Princeton University and jointly to Michel Mayor and Didier Queloz, Professors of Astrophysics at University of Geneva. Peebles shares one half of the prize for his 50 years of deep and consistent contribution to physical cosmology which led to a benchmark cosmological model named ΛCDM that passes most of the independent cosmological observational tests. Mayor and Queloz share jointly the other half of the prize for their discovery of Jupiter like planet around the Sun-like star, 51 Pegasi. Their contributions not only opened new perspectives of the observable universe but also confronted us with new questions in science. In this talk the speaker will go through Jim Peebles’ three breakthrough contributions that led to foundations of observational cosmology. The significant prospect of discovery of exoplanets around Sun-like stars will also be highlighted.

Dr Sanjeev Kalita is an Assistant Professor of Physics in the Department of Physics, GU and his research interests include Cosmology. He did his BSc in Physics from B Borooah College, Guwahati, Masters and PhD from this department. He was in Dibrugarh University for  short period before joining this institute in his present position.



September 13, 2019

  Title  The Age of Right Brain : The Innovative Mind
  Speaker Dr Kuladhar Saikia, Director General of Police (DGP), Assam
  TypePedagogic
  DateFriday, 13 September, 2019
  Time2:30 PM
  VenuePhysics Gallery, GU


Abstract

Creativity and divergent thinking are the prime movers in the present day world. Out of the box ideas have been regarded as the most preferred faculty which guides not only the corporate world, but also have ripples in the social dynamics for betterment of Humanity. Who possess the thinking brain would take the world forward.



Dr Kuladhar Saikia
Director General of Police (DGP), Assam


Biography

Dr Kuladhar Saikia, an officer of Indian Police Service (IPS) and is currently the Director General of Police (DGP) of Assam, who has been involved in issues relating to Community Development and Community Policing. An IPS officer from the 1985 batch in the Assam-Meghalaya Cadre, Dr Saikia is a recipient of President's police medals twice for his outstanding contribution to policing.

An extremely articulated and a person of intellect, Dr Saikia obtained his MA in Economics from the famed Delhi School of Economics and obtained his PhD from IIT Guwahati. He was a Fulbright Scholar at Pennsylvania State University, USA. Among many other distinguished positions, he has been a Consultant at World bank in Washington, Visiting Faculty at IIMs (Ahmedabad, Lucknow, and Rohtak), LKY School of Public Policy at Singapore University to name a few.

He is also an accomplished litterateur, who won the prestigious Sahitya Academy Award in 2015.


August 30, 2019

  Title  Negotiating the journey of life - creative imagination for success
  Speaker Dr Mridul Hazarika, Former Vice Chancellor, Gauhati University
  TypeMotivation
  DateFriday, 30 August, 2019
  Time2:30 PM
  VenuePhysics Gallery, GU


Abstract

Life is a journey, not a destination. Success in life depends on how we negotiate the twists and the turns in this journey. It is the imagination, which encircles our action, enabling the actions to culminate in success. How we develop the art of confronting challenges will determine the success story. Dr Hazarika is expected to talk about his experience about taking things forward in life.



Dr Mridul Hazarika
Former Vice Chancellor, Gauhati University


Biography

Dr Mridul Hazarika took over the charge as the 16th Vice Chancellor of this historic premier institution in August, 2013 and wrote a success story for this university. A chemist by profession, Dr Mridul Hazarika is an outstanding tea researcher of the country. He has been instrumental in bringing the Toklai Tea Research Institute in Jorhat to its present famed state, after he joined the institute as the Director in 2003 prior to his appointment as the Vice Chancellor of Gauhati University. An extensively travelled scientist in the country and abroad, Dr Hazarika is a visionary. With his vision, he has made his mark widely visible in this university! We cannot but forget the accelerated growth the university has witnessed during the last six years under the able guidance of Dr Hazarika which has culminated in the award of the Grade-A NAAC accreditation, which came just in time when Dr Hazarika was about to hand over the baton to the next leader in 2018! 



August 16, 2019

  Title  Apollo 11
  Director Todd Douglas Miller
  TypeMovie (Duration : 1 Hour 33 Mins)
  IMBD Rating G - 8.3/10 
  DateFriday, 16 August, 2019
  Time2:30 PM
  VenuePhysics Gallery, GU


Plot

A look at the Apollo 11 mission to land on the moon led by commander Neil Armstrong and pilots Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins.



Movie Poster


Cast

Buzz Aldrin, Joan Ann Archer, Janet Armstrong


Accuracy

The film takes some liberties with the timeline of the mission. For example, the incident involving Michael Collins’s biomed sensors going out, leading him to wisecrack, "I promise to let you know if I stop breathing," occurred during the return voyage, on day 8 of the mission, but is depicted as happening during the approach to the Moon before the separation of the command and lunar modules.


Reception

The movie received quite a good response in the Box Office. David Ehrlich complimented Miller's ability to make the Moon landing sequence feel unique and thrilling, and stated that the clarity of the footage 

". . . takes your breath away" 

In another review, Owen Gleiberman of Variety called the footage ". . .quite spectacular . . .", and many critics compared the documentary to Damien Chazelle's 2018 Neil Armstrong biopic First Man in their reviews. Glenn Kenny of The New York Times called the film ". . . entirely awe-inspiring . . ." and wrote, 

"Although we know how the mission turns out, the movie generates and maintains suspense. And it rekindles a crazy sense of wonder at, among other things, what one can do practically with trigonometry."



August 9, 2019

  Title  Nuclear reaction studies with accelerator : prospect and challenges
  Speaker Kushal Kalita, Physics Department, GU
  TypeInformative
  DateFriday, 9 August, 2019
  Time2:30 PM
  VenuePhysics Gallery, GU

Abstract

With the latest upliftment of pelletron accelarator across India and abroad it has become practical to run beatiful experiments on complete (or incomplete) fusion induced by loosely bound nuclei. One of such experiments was attempted at Australian National University, Australia and the insights have been delivered. The experiements with Radioactive ion beams is also quite challenging and carried out at IUAC with utmost causion and the reaction dynamics is studied. The fusion dynamics at sub-barrier energies depends on the couplings of various reaction channels such as deformation/orientation, non-elastic channels etc. Due to this, fusion is either enhanced or hindered depending on their influences. Experiments are also attempted to entangle the quadrupole and hexadecapole deformations through measurement of fusion excitation functions as well as by quasi-elastic measurements. A number of such experiments were performed at IUAC, New Delhi and at BARC-TIFR pelletron accelarator facilities and their results will be highlighted during the talk.


The Speaker

Dr Kushal Kalita  is an Associate Professor in the Physics Department of GU and have been with this department for last fourteen years. A PhD from University of Delhi, Dr Kalita has about 42 publications to his credit. He has been a BOYSCAST (DST) Post Doctoral researcher for one year at Australian National University, Canberra, Australia. Three scholars have obtained PhD under his supervision and presently guiding 4 more students. He is the Vice-President of Assam Physical Society(APS) which is  actively running Physics Olympiad for 10th and 12th standards students. He was the Joint Secretary of PANE (Physics Academy of the Northeast) from 2016 to 2018). Dr Kalita has completed 4 research projects under DST, UGC, IUAC, ASTEC respectively and presently running one under DAE-BRNS.


Dr Kushal Kalita



May 17, 2019

  Title  Magnetic polarons in type-II ZnTe/(Zn,Mn)Se and (Zn,Mn)Te/ZnSe quantum dots
  Speaker Biplob Barman, University of Michigan-Flint, United States
  TypeResearch Seminar
  DateFriday, 17 May, 2019
  Time2:30 PM
  VenuePhysics Gallery, GU

Abstract

We used magneto-optical photoluminescence (PL), both continuous wave (cw) and time resolved (TR), to investigate the interaction of manganese ions with charge carriers (electrons/holes) in two related, spatially indirect, (II,Mn)VI, epitaxially grown quantum dot (QD) structures - ZnTe/(Zn,Mn)Se [Sample A] and (Zn,Mn)Te/ZnSe [Sample B]. In case of Sample A, the cw-PL measurements reveal that the degree of circular polarisation P is strongly dependent on the laser excitation energy. We relate this finding to that associated with Sample B where the exciting photon energy has no effect on the value of circular polarisation. Our TR-PL studies shed light on the properties of Magnetic Polaron (MP), a cloud of localised magnetic ion spins aligned through exchange interaction with the spin of a confined carrier, in the two QD systems. A conventional understanding suggests that the MP formation energy EMP , measured from the red-shift of the band-edge PL, decreases rapidly with an increase in temperature and applied magnetic field. While this conventional behaviour holds true for the ZnTe/(Zn,Mn)Se QD structures, MP in the other system shows a weak dependence on temperature and magnetic field. We attribute this unique MP behaviour to the difference in the strength of the exchange interaction between the Mn and the hole spins, which are spatially separated in Sample A, but in close proximity in Sample B.


The Speaker

Dr Biplob Barman is currently an Assistnat Professor with University of Michigan-Flint. He did is  Masters in Physics from University of Delhi in 2007 and obtained his PhD from State Universuty of New York at Buffalo in 2015. His research interests include design and development of experiments to characterise nanomaterials (bulk epilayers, quantum wells, quantum dots) in the UV, visible and IR range.



Dr Biplob Barman


May 10, 2019

  Title  Semiconducting Nanostructures : Synthesis to Applications
  Speaker Sunandan Baruah, Centre of Excellence in Nanotechnology, Assam Don Bosco University, Guwahati
  TypeAdvances in Science, of General Interest
  DateFriday, 10 May, 2019
  Time2:30 PM
  VenuePhysics Gallery, GU

Abstract

Nanotechnology is the technology of the 21st century. It deals with materials with physical dimensions less than 100 nm in at least one dimension. Nanomaterials exhibit properties totally different from their bulk counterparts and that is precisely why scientists are exploring possibilities of novel applications in diverse fields. Nanomaterials are finding applications in sensing, solar energy harvesting, medical diagnostics and targeted drug delivery, space technology, environmental remediation, optical and electronic filters, self-cleaning surfaces, anti scratch paints, nanoenergy harvesting, amongst many others. Semiconducting nanomaterials are attractive as their properties can be tailored for various applications. These nanomaterials can be synthesized following top down techniques where a bulk material is broken down to nanosizes using sophisticated instruments or they can be synthesized using a bottom up route where individual atoms are assembled to get the desired size and morphology. Semiconducting nanostructures are now widely used in the areas of environmental sensing and remediation, optical filters and sensors, photocatalysis, dye and quantum dot sensitized solar cells, self-cleaning surfaces, smart pesticides, superhydrophobic surfaces, etc. There is an apprehension amongst many that nanomaterials can be toxic for the ecosystem and should be avoided. Toxicity studies are ongoing and the best approach at the moment is to be careful and not allow suspended nanoparticles to end up in the eosystem.


The Speaker

Dr Sunandan Baruah is presently at Assam Don Bosco University, Guwahati as the Director of, Centre of Excellence in Nanotechnology and Professor of Department of Electronics & Communication Engineering. Dr Baruah has been a Research Faculty at Electron Microscopy & Nanoelectronics (Angstrom Laboratoriet, Uppsala University, Sweden) and Research Specialist at Asian Institute of Technology (Thailand)

Dr Baruah’s research interest is in Environmental Nanotechnology. His research concept is to make use of inexpensive wet chemical methods to fabricate innovative materials and device components. His research group is using semiconducting and metallic nanomaterials for applications like water purification, contamination sensing, solar energy harvesting, functional building materials, nano-piezotronics, nano-medicine, smart packaging, self cleaning surfaces. He has published widely with over 4100 citations.

Dr Baruah is also a social entrepreneur and his company Globinno Engineering Solutions is currently manufacturing Nanotechnology based solar powered water purifiers and fruit and vegetable dryers targeted for use by the rural populace.



Dr Sunandan Baruah



May 3, 2019

  Title  Diagnostic nuclear medicine
  Speaker Sanjoy Khangjrakpam and Tasneem Ahmed, Physics Department, GU
  TypeStudent Seminar
  DateFriday, 3 May, 2019
  Time2:30 PM
  VenuePhysics Gallery, GU

Abstract

Nuclear medicine is a medical specialty that involves the use of radioactive substances in the diagnosis and treatment of diseases. Unlike X-Rays in which the source of radiation is outside, in nuclear medicine the source of radiation in from within the body and this radiation is detected by nuclear radiation detectors and various imaging techniques are used to generate images of the internal organs. Nuclear medicine is entirely possible because of the advances in nuclear physics and is based upon some core principles of physics, chemistry and of course biology. In this presentation we will see how radioactive isotopes help in the diagnosis of diseases along with the help of gamma cameras and different scanning techniques like PET/SPECT scan.


The Speakers

Sanjoy and Tasneem are students of MSc (Physics) 4th Semester, graduating this year. Sanjoy did his BSc from DM College of Science, Manipur University, while Tasneem did her BSc from B Borooah College, both in 2017



April 26, 2019

  Title  Stress that affects human persona : Special reference to psychodynamic stress
  Speaker Anjan Chowdhury, Senior Consultant at Indian Institute of Entrepreneurship, Guwahati
  TypeGeneral Interest
  DateFriday, 26 April, 2019
  Time2:30 PM
  VenuePhysics Gallery, GU

Abstract

The talk will focus on the importance of stress identification and its impact of students’ behavioural attributes and patterns.



Sri Anjan Chowdhury


The Speaker

Sri Anjan Chowdhury is a Senior Consultant at the Indian Institute of Entrepreneurship and is the Head of the Training and Development, Guwahati, Indian Skills Academy, Guwahati.

Sri Chowdhury did his post graduation in Hospitality and Appled Nutrition and also is a recipient of Vocational Excellence Award in 2015. He was also a trainer to represent Indian Pedagogy of Skilled Training in London under UKIERI (UK india Education Research initiative) in Plymouth College of Hospitality studies, UK.



April 5, 2019

  Title  The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind (2019)
  Director Chiwetel Ejiofor (also Starring)
  TypeMovie (Duration 1 hour 52 mins)
  DateFriday, 5 April, 2019
  Time2:30 PM
  VenuePhysics Gallery, GU

Plot

William Kamkuamb was born in the state of Malawi, which is located in Africa. When he was fourteen years old, a terrible drought hit the village where he lived. People had nothing to eat and drink. Being an excellent student and very fond of physics, the guy decides to save his native village from starvation. In the library he finds scientific books on physics. Unfortunately, they were all exclusively in English. But the hero did not give up. For a long time studying pictures and different symbols in Latin, the guy got an idea to build a wind generator.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Boy_Who_Harnessed_the_Wind


Cast

Chiwetel Ejiofor as Trywell Kamkwamba
Maxwell Simba as William Kamkwamba
Felix Lemburo as John Kamkwamba

Reception

The film has a IMDb rating of 7.6/10 based on about 7000 reviews. Some of the review by the public:

"... This film is absolutely great, and I recommend everyone to just watch it right now on Netflix. This needs to be seen and supported. It is full of interesting and powerful themes that are rarely portrayed like this in cinema, and teaches a lot of important lessons without ever being preachy about it. It's one of these based on a true story movies that are actually really good and achieve what they are going for, and also match the importance and beauty of the real tale ..."

"... What a great movie - powerful acting, cinematography and story line. Heartwarming, powerful and emotional - it brought tears of sadness and joy! Thoroughly recommend. ..."



March 8, 2019

  Title  Large Hadron Collider (LHC)
  Speakers Ratul Khan and Jamuna Mazumdar, Physics Department, GU
  TypeStudent Seminar
  DateFriday, 8 March, 2019
  Time2:30 PM
  VenuePhysics Gallery, GU

Abstract

It is the world’s largest and most powerful particle collider. It is built to discover new particles and to answer some of unsolved questions in Physics. The speakers will also discuss about its construction, working, detectors inside it, Higgs discovery and formation of QGP etc.

Ratul and Jamuna, both are students of MSc Physics in their final semester. Both of them are brilliant students. While Ratul is the 1st Position Holder in his BSc from Pragjyotish College, Guwahati, Jamuna is the 2nd Position holder in her BSc from Dakshin Kamrup College, Mirza.


March 1, 2019

  Title  The man who knew infinity
  Director Mathew Brown
  TypeMovie
  DateFriday, 1 March, 2019
  Time2:30 PM
  VenuePhysics Gallery, GU

Plot

At the turn of the twentieth century, Srinivasa Ramanujan is a struggling and indigent citizen in the city of Madras in India working at menial jobs at the edge of poverty. While performing his menial labor, his employers notice that he seems to have exceptional skills at mathematics and they begin to make use of him for rudimentary accounting tasks. It becomes equally clear to his employers, who are college educated, that Ramanujan's mathematical insights exceed the simple accounting tasks they are assigning to him and soon they encourage him to make his personal writings in mathematics available to the general public and to start to contact professors of mathematics at universities by writing to them. One such letter is sent to G.H. Hardy, a famous mathematician at University of Cambridge, who begins to take a special interest in Ramanujan. This film is about the genius Ramanujan

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Man_Who_Knew_Infinity_(film)

Cast

Dev Patel as Srinivasa Ramanujan
Jeremy Irons as G. H. Hardy
Devika Bhise as Janaki

Reception

Film review aggregator Rotten Tomatoes reports that 62% of critics gave the film a positive rating, based on 123 reviews with an average score of 6.1/10. The critics' consensus reads: "The Man Who Knew Infinity might be a tad too conventional to truly do its subject justice, but Dev Patel and Jeremy Irons elevate the end result beyond mere biopic formula."



February 15, 2019

  Title  Probing the magnetosphere
  Speaker Murchana Khusroo, Physics Department, GU
  TypeResearch / Pedagogic Seminar
  DateFriday, 15 February, 2019
  Time2:30 PM
  VenuePhysics Gallery, GU

Abstract

A magnetosphere is an imaginary volume in space around any astronomical object over which its magnetic field can be felt. It is a harsh place where intense plasma activity can be found all the time. Bombarded by the highly energetic solar wind plasma, Earth’s magnetosphere is a site of major nonlinear plasma phenomena about which we do not have proper knowledge. It acts as a natural plasma laboratory where theories can be put to test and it has been monitored by several space borne missions, since decades. One such ongoing operation is the Cluster II mission under the European Space Agency (ESA), whose main objective is to record the various magnetospheric plasma activities occurring throughout the magnetosphere. In this talk, I will discuss about the magnetosphere and its dynamics as well as the role of Cluster spacecrafts and its contribution in this field.

Murchana is a Research Scholar in the Physics Department. She did her graduation from J B College, Jorhat with 3rd position in the university and completed MSc in 2012 from Gauhati University. She is also a recipient of the Newton-Bhabha Fellowship in 2017 for a Summer Student Programme at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL), Oxfordshire, England.

One of her recent research papers has been highlighted in Physical Review E Kaleidoscope for the month of January 2019.



February 8, 2019

  Title  Future energy solution through TOKAMAK like machines
  Speaker Dr Rita Paikaray, Ravenshaw University, Cuttack
  TypeResearch / Pedagogic Seminar
  DateFriday, 8 February, 2019
  Time2:30 PM
  VenuePhysics Gallery, GU

Abstract

It is a brief discussion about future energy need, Alternate source of energy for future, Different methods of plasma confinement, about TOKAMAK, ITER, and research at Ravenshaw University in this regard.

Dr Rita Paikaray is a Professor of Physics at Ravenshaw University in Cuttack, Odisha. Dr Paikaray has worked and published extensively on the field of Plasma Physics. She is also the Dean of Students' Welfare and Dean of School of Physics Sciences at Ravenshaw. Dr Paikaray obtained her Masters in Physics from Utkal University and her PhD in Plasma Physics from Delhi University. Her research interests include Plasma Physics and Ultrasonics.



February 1, 2019

  Title  Unraveling the mystery of the cosmos through meteorites and isotopes
  Speaker Dipankar Pathak, Institut für Geologie, Universität Bern, Switzerland
  TypeResearch Seminar
  DateFriday, 1 February, 2019
  Time3:30 PM
  VenuePhysics Gallery, GU

Abstract

Meteorites are some of the early formed Solar System materials, which incorporates chemical fingerprints of the physical and chemical processes that led to formation of planetary bodies. In this talk, the listeners will be given a touch of the very basic science and technology involved in the studies of these materials, ranging from sample preparation to analyses using range of instruments. Special emphasis will be given with respect to the latest findings on some recent meteorites from Assam, as well as on possible future implications of several studies on them.

Dr Dipankar Pathak, an alumnus of GU from the Department of Geology is presently working with Institut für Geologie, Universität Bern, Switzerland on Cosmochemistry - a branch of science devoted to study of the chemical composition of matter in the universe and the processes that led to those compositions. Dr Pathak has obtained his MTech from Institute for Earth Sciences, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore and PhD in Cosmochemistry from Institut für Geologie, Universität Bern.



November 16, 2018

  Title  Quasars
  Speaker Nirmali Das and Tanushree Bezbaruah, Physics Department, GU
  TypeStudent Seminar
  DateFriday, 16 November, 2018
  Time2:30 PM
  VenuePhysics Gallery, GU

Abstract

Quasars, one of the distant and strangest objects in the sky, are still open as a vast area of research. The light from these distant objects takes billions of light years to reach us. As we look at them, we are actually looking backwards in time. So these objects at such distances are the brightest objects that we see in the sky. In this project we've tried to study some basic properties of quasars by looking into their spectrum and see how quasars characteristics vary at different redshifts. Studying these distant objects can help us to find answers to some deep questions in cosmology. .

Nirmali and Tanushree are students from 3rd Semester, MSc (Physics), Physics Department, GU.



November 9, 2018

  Title   Physics Nobel Prize, 2018
  Speaker  Dr Anurup Gohain Barua, Physics Department, GU
  Type Popular
  Date Friday, 9 November, 2018
  Time 2:30 PM
  Venue Physics Gallery, GU

Abstract

This year’s Nobel Prize in Physics has been awarded for Groundbreaking Inventions in the Field of Laser Physics to Arthur Ashkin, Gérard Mourou, and Donna Strickland. Optical Tweezers (invented by Ashkin) are scientific instruments that use a highly focused laser beam to provide an attractive or repulsive force (typically on the order of piconewtons), depending on the relative refractive index between the particle and surrounding medium, to physically hold and move microscopic objects. Chirped Pulse Amplification (developed by Mourou and Strickland) is a method of generating high-intensity, ultra-short optical pulses. In this talk, there will be a discussion on these two techniques.

Prof Anurup Gohain Barua is a Professor in the Physics Department, GU. He obtained his PhD from Dibrugarh University in the field of Lasers and Spectroscopy and now heads this division at GU. His research interests include bioluminescence.


November 2, 2018

  Title   Quantum Dot
  Speaker  Lucky Saikia and Khomdram Bijoy Kumar Singh, Physics Department, GU
  Type Student Seminar
  Date Friday, 2 November, 2018
  Time 2:30 PM
  Venue Physics Gallery, GU

Abstract

The speakers will discuss about the quantum mechanical treatment of nano-materials then exciton concept and application of quantum dot.

Lucky Saikia and Khomdram Bijoy Kumar Singh are students of 3rd Semester of MSc Physics at Physics, GU.=



October 26, 2018

  Title   Connecting dark matter to neutrinos
  Speaker  Dr Subhaditya Bhattacharya, Department of Physics, IIT Guwahati
  Type Research Colloquium
  Date Friday, 26 October, 2018
  Time 2:30 PM
  Venue Physics Gallery, GU

Abstract

A concrete motivation for studying physics beyond the Standard Model emerges from the observation of massive neutrinos and astrophysical evidences of dark matter. Although, heavily different on mass scale, both of these species are electromagnetic charge neutral and weakly coupled to visible sector. This raises a question whether these two apparently uncorrelated particles have something in common although neutrinos themselves cannot qualify as successful dark matter candidate(s). In this talk, we plan to discuss some model frameworks where both neutrino mass and dark matter phenomenology can be addressed together and specifically elaborate those cases where a one-to-one connection may be built.

Dr Subhaditya Bhattacharya is an Assistant Professor from the Department of Physics, IIT Guwahati.


September 28, 2018

  Title   Hertzsprung–Russell (HR) diagram
  Speaker  Nirmali Das and Binita Saikia, Physics Department, GU
  Type Student Seminar
  Date Friday, 28 September, 2018
  Time 2:30 PM
  Venue Physics Gallery, GU

Abstract

Earlier, when people looked at the night sky, they could gather informations only from the difference in brightness of the stars. With the passage of time, the advancement of both theory and observation, we get the opportunity to look deeper into the evolution of the stars and their properties. A single plot of stars’ Absolute Magnitude versus Spectral Type by Ejnar Hertzsprung and HenryNorris Russell in 1912, the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram is a robust tool for studying characteristics, composition, age, evolution of stars. In this talk we will present stellar properties and the evolution based on the HR diagram. The recent advances made by the GAIA mission will also be highlighted. Also we have tried to plot a few HR diagram by taking data from ATNF, CSIRO, and SDSS.

Nirmali and Binita are students from 3rd Semester of MSc Physics. They are interested in studying the physics of stars.

 

A H-R diagram of the Milky Way and an artist's impression of the GAiA Mission


September 21, 2018

  Title   Some astrophysical issues with the ΛCDM universe
  Speaker  Dr Sanjeev Kalita, Physics Department, GU
  Type Research Colloquium
  Date Friday, 21 September, 2018
  Time 2:30 PM
  Venue Physics Gallery, GU

Abstract

Modern cosmology has grown into an independent science in its own – thanks to enormous progress in large scale astronomical surveys. Results of observational cosmology gathered in the last 70 years have now converged to a cosmological model. In this talk, the author will briefly highlight certain fundamental problems of the current ΛCDM paradigm of cosmology. It constitutes the standard relativistic hot Big Bang cosmology established by independent observational tests performed till last decade. In recent times, however, refinements in astronomical observations of distant and nearby universe have revealed few questions for the canonical model. Applications of the ΛCDM paradigm to astronomy on scales smaller than c/H0 indicate some anomalies. Missing satellites, galaxies without halos, Hubble parameter anomaly, epoch of first stars (Pop III) and pure disk galaxies are marked examples. It also addresses the question – “has general relativity, on which ΛCDM is based, been sufficiently tested?”. Observational tests of the ΛCDM model, challenges in testing general relativity on cosmological scales and a few recent findings on astrophysical tests of the theory will be highlighted.

Dr Sanjeev Kalita is an Assistant Professor at the Physics Department, Gauhati University. He as an alumnus of B Borooah College, Guwahati and the Physics Department, GU. He obtained his PhD in Cosmology from GU.



September 14, 2018

  Title   NMR as a local probe and new trends of using it
  Speaker  Dr Tanmoy Chakrabarty, National Institute of Chemical Physics and Biophysics, Tallinn, Estonia
  Type Research Colloquium
  Date Friday, 14 September, 2018
  Time 2:30 PM
  Venue Physics Gallery, GU

Abstract

NMR is a very effective local probe technique to extract the spin susceptibility and the local information from a magnetic system. In a novel magnetic system, local probe technique such as NMR gives the inner picture about the surrounding magnetic environment of the magnetic ion which helps us understanding the subtle behaviours governing the novelty of the corresponding system. Very recently a new experimental trend has been developed using NMR as a local probe. Here, materials like transition metal ion-doped substrates are used to attain enhancement of NMR signal using dynamic nuclear polarisation (DNP) which includes the complete bulk materials, not only the substrates. This can be hugely applied in medical sciences (MRI) to attain enhancement in a rather novel way which does not include chemical change of the substrate or restrict the effect only within the surface. In this talk, the author discusses two such materials where one can be used as a potential candidate developing the new technique using transition metal ion-doped DNP and another one with spin-glass characteristics.

Dr Tanmoy Chakrabarty is a Postdoctoral Fellow (Mobillitas) in the National Institute of Chemical Physics and Biophysics, Estonia



September 7, 2018

  Title   The Martian (Screening of Movie)
  Director  Ridley Scott 
  Type  Science Fiction 
  IMDb Summary Rating : PG-13, Duration : 2 hr 24 min, IMDb Rating : 8.0/10 
  Lead Matt Demon
  Date Friday, 7 September, 2018
  Time 2:30 PM
  Venue Physics Gallery, GU

Plot & Summary

The Martian is a 2015 science fiction film directed by Ridley Scott and starring Matt Damon. The screenplay by Drew Goddard is based on Andy Weir's 2011 novel The Martian about an astronaut who is mistakenly presumed dead and left behind on Mars. The film depicts his struggle to survive and others' efforts to rescue him. It also stars Jessica Chastain, Kristen Wiig, Jeff Daniels, Michael Peña, Kate Mara, Sean Bean, Sebastian Stan, Donald Glover, Aksel Hennie, and Chiwetel Ejiofor.

The film, produced through 20th Century Fox, is a co-production of the United States and the United Kingdom. Producer Simon Kinberg began developing the film after Fox optioned the novel in March 2013, which Drew Goddard adapted into a screenplay and was initially attached to direct, but the film did not move forward. Scott replaced Goddard, and with Damon in place as the main character, production was approved. Filming began in November 2014 and lasted approximately seventy days. Twenty sets were built on a sound stage in Budapest, Hungary, one of the largest in the world. Wadi Rum in Jordan was also used as a backdrop for filming.


  


August 24, 2018

 Title   Black hole and galaxies: A preliminary study on an intricate connection
  Speaker  Mrigen Kakati and Tanushree Bezbaruah, Physics Department, GU
  Type Student Seminar
  Date Friday, 24 August, 2018
  Time 2:30 PM
  Venue Physics Gallery, GU

Abstract

In this talk we will basically focus on supermassive black holes at centers of galaxies described by Schwarzschild and Kerr solution of general relativity. After going through historical aspects we will discuss few important evidences of massive black holes in galaxies. They include stellar cusp and gas dynamics near the Galactic Centre and the centers of NGC 4258, M87, M32 and M84 and NGC 3115. The connection between spin of the black holes (Kerr solution) and AGN activity will be discussed. Finally we will highlight the black hole demography and role played by black holes in formation of different types of galaxies in the universe. Some current frontiers such as swarm of black holes close to the Galactic Center, test of general relativity will also be discussed. 

About the Speakers

Mrigen and Tanushree are students of 3rd Semester, MSc Physics. Mrigen graduated from Pandu College and Tanushree graduated from B Baruah College in 2017. They both secured 1st class in their graduation.



August 10, 2018

 Title   Artificial Intelligence (AI)
  Speaker  Mrinmay Medhi and Phulmani Basumatary, Physics Department, GU
  Type Informative
  Date Friday, 10 August, 2018
  Time 2:30 PM
  Venue Physics Gallery, GU

Abstract

Is our machine or computer intelligent? The answer is No. Our computers are too fast to handle problems or can stimulate work, but it follow instructions. So we want to develop a system that can think, do the work by itself, and correct them automatically if something wrong. That type of intelligence of a machine is called artificial intelligence. ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE (AI) is the ability of a machine to think and learn. In general , by AI we mean a machine which is the replica of human being, that understands us, our language and behaviour. At present we use the term AI for successful understanding human speech, computing at a high level in strategic game system(such as chess and go), self driving car, Image processing, interpreting complex data. AI involves many different fields like computer science, mathematics, neuroscience, etc. Eventually researcher hope to create a "General artificial intelligence" which can solve many problems instead of focusing on one task.  

About the Speakers

Mrinmay and Phulmani are students from 3rd Semester of MSc Physics. They will be the first speakers of this session.



May 11, 2018

 Title   Reminiscence of Stephen Hawking and Cambridge University in the early 1970s
  Speaker  Prof Hira Lal Duorah, Former Professor of Physics, GU and Former Vice Chancellor, GU
  Type Popular
  Date Friday, 11 May, 2018
  Time 2:30 PM
  Venue Physics Gallery, GU

Abstract

Stephen Hawking, probably the world’s most famous scientist, has a paper with more than 3000 citations. Hawking’s paper which was published in 1975, in fact, has crossed 4000 citations as of 2011. On the other hand the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) papers of 2000 have about 3000 citations. This work can be compared to Ptolemy’s Almagest. The SDSS is one of the most successful venture in the entire history of Astronomy worthy of a place alongside the works of Ptolemy, Galileo, Newton and the other all times greats. The name of Stephen Hawking first impinged on popular awareness. He was becoming the black hole Cosmonaut trapped in a crippled body piercing the mysteries of the Universe with the mind of a latter-day Einstein, going where only angels feared to tread. At the age of 32, Hawking was invited to become the Fellow of the Royal Society (FRS) on March 1974. Many more scientific achievements crowned him all the way. His A Brief History of Time has a profound history and his passing away on an auspicious day make us bound to offer a heartfelt homage and make us all deeply grateful to this scion of a great family of scientists.



Stephan Hawking (1942 - 2018)

About the Speaker

Prof Hira Lal Duorah is one of the first few physicists of this region to start work on Astrophysics. A PhD in Astrophysics from Delhi University, he went on to become Vice Chancellor of this university. He is also credited for establishing the first astronomical observatory of the Northeast India, the Gauhati University Observatory (GUO) in the 1980s.



May 4, 2018

 Title   A day in the life of an Indian Cop - and what we can learn from it
  Speaker  Anand Mishra, IPS (SP & Head of Vigilance and Anti Corruption Department, Assam)
  Type Popular
  Date Friday, 4 May, 2018
  Time 2:30 PM
  Venue Physics Gallery, GU

Abstract

Indian civil service is an integral and indispensible component of Indian social structure. Moreover, the security personnel have a very important, crucial and responsible role to play: to make the life of citizens of the country safe, secure and comfortable. Not only do they make us safe and secure from external forces, they also are doing marvelous job in maintaining the internal peace and harmony of the country. In carrying out these responsibilities, they have to face extremely severe challenges, hurdles and harsh conditions, of which the citizens may not be aware. In this lecture, Sri Mishra would try to portray a real life picture of an Indian Civil Servant (IPS) - what they have to face while fighting against militants, and while fulfilling other duties of the job. In particular, he would like to share some real life experiences while he served as Deputy Magistrate, Deputy Collector/SDO (Civil) and Executive Magistrate in West Bengal, and as a part of the counter insurgency operations on the ground in Garo Hills of Meghalaya while being an SP of Vigilance and Anti Corruption, Assam, and as trainer of special force in Assam Police. The humble and noble purpose of this lecture would be to inspire the younger generation, to instill a positive attitude in them, and to evoke energy in them to fight against any odds and challenges of life.



SP Anand Mishra, IPS

About the Speaker

SP Anand Mishra did his graduation in Political Science (Honours) from St. Xavier’s College, Kolkata. Then he served as a West Bengal Civil Service Officer for Govt. of West Bengal from 2005 to 2011 - worked as Deputy Magistrate and Dy. Collector / SDO (Civil) and an Executive Magistrate. He has been 2011 Batch Directly Commissioned IPS officer of Assam-Meghalaya Cadre. Thereafter, he served for Govt. of Meghalaya after joining IPS and was mostly leading Counter Insurgency Operations on the ground in Garo Hills areas of Meghalaya against groups like ANVC /ANCA / UALA / GNLA-ULFA Combine and other active militant / insurgent groups. His last Posting in Meghalaya was as SP, South Garo Hills District Baghmara. Then he got transferred from Meghalaya segment to Assam in March, 2017 and has been serving Govt. of Assam since then. He was posted briefly for less than a month as SP, Bureau of Investigation (Economic Offences Wing), Assam. Since April 2017 SP Mishra has been serving as Superintendent of Police, Vigilance and Anti Corruption, Assam with additional charge of Training a special force (SMART Protection Unit) for Assam Police.

He is a recipient of Presidents's Police Medal for Gallantry Award in 2016 for successful Counter Insurgency Operations. SP Mishra is also a 3rd Dan Black Belt in Karate and is giving personal and physical training to the Assam Police Commandos in Close Quarter Combat (CQC) / Close Quarter Battle (CQB) and tactical use of Fire Arms. He is a passionate Biker and also nurtures music (Humming over Guitar) as Hobbies.


April 27, 2018

Title   RADAR Technology and its Applications
  Speaker  Anupam Chetia and Bonopriya Paul, Physics Department, GU
  Type Student Seminar
  Date Friday, 27 April, 2018
  Time 2:30 PM
  Venue Physics Gallery, GU

Abstract

If you have sometimes experienced the reflection of sound / echo when you shout towards a valley or mountain, you have in a way experienced how RADAR functions. The time an echo requires to come back can be used to estimate the distance of reflecting object, provided the speed of sound in air is known. RADAR functions in a similar manner to find out the location of a reflecting object using radio waves. So, what is RADAR?

RADAR, acronym for RAdio Detection And Ranging has been with us for several decades. During last few years numerous developments have not only improved and matured this technology but also paved the road for many applications besides the traditional domains. RADAR have been employed on ground, in air, on sea, and in space for detecting and locating objects. In this seminar, we shall try to see how this seemingly simple technology can be used in various useful situations.

  


April 20, 2018

 Title   Exoplanets - a vista beyond the Solar System
  Speaker  Yoshini Bailung and Devabrat Sharma, Physics Department, GU
  Type Student Seminar
  Date Friday, 20 April, 2018
  Time 2:30 PM
  Venue Physics Gallery, GU

Abstract

"If humanity is to survive long-term, it must find a way to get off planet Earth" - Stephen Hawking. The Universe is a harsh cold empty place that doesn’t support life to form but somehow earth created a sanctuary that made our existence possible. It is incredibly unlikely but the fact that it happened once means that may be it happened again. In 1992, Aleksander Wolszczan and Dale Frail, found two planets orbiting a pulsar. In 1995, 51 Pegasi - the first exoplanet of a main sequence star was discovered by Didier Queloz and Michel Mayor. Since then, more than thousands of exoplanents have been discovered through various space programs. In our talk, we will describe about the methods of discovering an exoplanet, missions and discoveries of earth like planets and future prospects associated with them.


Exoplanet HIP 65426b is the first discovered planet around star HIP 65426.

Yoshini and Devabrat are students of 2nd Semester of MSc Physics.



April 13, 2018

 Title   Plasma Nanoscience - an introduction to plasma-assisted fabrication of nanomaterials
  Speaker  Jnanraj Borah and Biswajit Dehingia, Physics Department, GU 
  Type Student Seminar
  Date Friday, 13 April, 2018
  Time 2:30 PM
  Venue Physics Gallery, GU

Abstract

Plasma assisted processes are now becoming an emerging tool for the fabrication of nanomaterials. These processes has some advantages like reduced growth temperature, good adhesion of thin films etc. The talk contains, comparison of some plasma assisted fabrication processes with other methods and how the material properties can be changed by controlling the plasma parameters.

Jnanraj and Biswajit are students of 4th Semester of MSc Physics.



March 23, 2018

 Title   Graphene -The Modern Mystery Material
  Speaker  Pranjal Choudhury and Kuladeep Kalita, Physics Department, GU 
  Type Student Seminar
  Date Friday, 23 March, 2018
  Time 2:30 PM
  Venue Physics Gallery, GU

Abstract

Graphene, an allotrope of Carbon is a two dimensional sheet of Graphite bonded hexagonally by sp2 hybridized carbon atom. Discovered in 2004 by Andre Geim & Konstantin Novoselov, Graphene is of great importance as of today because of its remarkable properties & application in the field of electronics, chemical and biomedical science making it a supermaterial that could launch a revolution.

Pranjal and Kuldeep are students of 4th Semester of MSc Physics.



March 16, 2018

 Title   Fluorescence and its applications
  Speaker  Dipjyoti Sarma and Amlan Jyoti Borah, Physics Department, GU 
  Type Student Seminar
  Date Friday, 16 March, 2018
  Time 2:30 PM
  Venue Physics Gallery, GU

Abstract

Fluorescence spectroscopy is now becoming an important component to study the molecular systems. So, it is being applied to many fields such as material sciences, biological sciences, chemical sciences depending upon the need. Laser Induced Fluorescence is now becoming an important research tool for studying those systems. The spectral signature of the biological processes can be realised quantitatively by studying the steady state and time resolved phenomena.

Dipjyoti and Amlan Jyoti are students of 4th Semester of MSc Physics.


Obituary

The seminar will be preceded by a 15 minute presentation on the life of the legendary cosmologist Stephan Hawking, who died two days ago on 14th March in Cambridge (UK).



Stephan Hawking in Free Fall


February 9, 2018

 Title   A movie on the life of Stephen Hawking - Theory of Everything
  Type Movie
  Date Friday, 9 February, 2018
  Time 2:30 PM
  Venue Physics Gallery, GU

Storyline

Theory of Everything (2hr 3min, IMDB Rating : 7.7/10, PG-13, 2014) is a movie about the famed physicist Stephen Hawking, emphasising on his relationship with his wife - Jane Wilde the arts student he fell in love with whilst studying at Cambridge in the 1960s. Little was expected from Stephen Hawking, a bright but shiftless student of cosmology, given just two years to live following the diagnosis of a fatal illness at 21 years of age. He became galvanized, however, by the love of fellow Cambridge student, Jane Wilde, and he went on to be called the successor to Einstein, as well as a husband and father to their three children. Over the course of their marriage as Stephen's body collapsed and his academic renown soared, fault lines were exposed that tested the lineaments of their relationship and dramatically altered the course of both of their lives.


http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2980516/



November 10, 2017

 Title   Elusion - thy name is gravity
  Speaker Madhurjya P Bora, Department of Physics, Gauhati University
  Type Pedagogic
  Date Friday, 10 November, 2017
  Time 2:30 PM
  Venue Physics Gallery, GU

Abstract

One of the greatest mystery of present-day physics stems from gravity, so much so that a full theory of gravity still eludes us. Gravity is full of puzzles. Though it is the weakest force at the quantum level (meaning gravity hardly plays any role in formation of structure of the basic building blocks of material), it is the omnipresent, long range range force which holds the Universe in one piece and thus responsible for all kinds of large scale structures that now exist in the Universe.

The most puzzling discovery involving gravity in present times is the existence of Dark Energy, about which we just know next to nothing! The LIGO project which helped us unravel one of the consequences of Einstein's theory of gravity has just put one more piece of the great jigsaw puzzle toward our understanding about how the Universe works. Today's talk will be a musings of some of the pieces of this jigsaw puzzle which led to the discovery by LIGO.


https://www.ligo.caltech.edu

The LIGO gravitational wave detector (interferometer)

Dr Madhurjya P Bora is a Professor in the Department of Physics, GU. He did hid MSc in Physics and PhD in Plasma Physics from Delhi University and has been a Postdoctoral Fellow at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT, US) and a Commonwealth Fellow at York Plasma Institute (University of York, UK). His research interests include Plasma Physics, Astrophysics, and Nonlinear Dynamics.



November 3, 2017

 Title   Cosmic Microwave Background and its Implications
  Speaker Jinti Barman, MSc 3rd Semester, Physics, GU
  Type Student Seminar
  Date Friday, 3 November, 2017
  Time 2:30 PM
  Venue Physics Gallery, GU

Abstract

Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) is the remnant of the Universe's early hot phase. The universe is filled with nearly isotropic background radiation. CMB has given clue to the physics of the early universe and formation of cosmic structures – the filaments of galaxies. This talk has its prime focus on what led to discovery of CMB, it's homogeneity and isotropy, anisotropy. This talk also emphasize on importance of CMB radiation.



October 27, 2017

 Title   Intellectual Property Rights
  Speaker S Devnath, Assam Science Technology Council (ASTEC)
  Type Informative
  Date Friday, 27 October, 2017
  Time 2:30 PM
  Venue Physics Gallery, GU

Abstract

Intellectual Property (IP) is a kind of property that arises from the creations of mind. For example, an invention (Eg. a new type of writing pen or a new composition of facewash), a design (Eg. a new design of a motorbike’s wheels or a ladies’ handbag), literary work (Eg. Lyrics of a song, a new children’s story), brand logo of a new cell phone company etc.- are all IPs of the respective creators/owners. However, as these IPs have commercial value and are recognised as a form of property, they can be registered in the name of the creators/owners as Patents, Industrial Designs, Copyright, Trademark respectively which are known as Intellectual Property Rights (IPR). IPRs provide legal ownership to the creators/owners over their IPs and hence they can exploit (use, sell, licence, assign) to earn from them without any fear of someone copying from their work. That is why a book series like Harry Potter can make millions not only from selling of the books but also from the movies and merchandise based on it without the fear of anyone copying it. This lecture introduces the basics of IP and the IPRs and how students and all can identify, register and earn from their IPs.

Sri S Debnath is a Scientist with the Patent Division of ASTEC and has elaborate knowledge about Intellectual Property Rights. ASTEC is also one of the nodal agency in Assam which helps in obtain an IPR.



October 13, 2017

  Title   Globular Clusters and their Role in Cosmology
  Speaker Mriganka Bujar Baruah and Ankita Khanal, MSc 3rd Semester, Physics, GU
  Type Student Seminar
  Date Friday, 13 October, 2017
  Time 2:30 PM
  Venue Physics Gallery, GU

Abstract

Globular clusters consist of old, low mass population II stars formed in the early universe, and are presently found in the halo of the galaxies. As being among the oldest members of the universe, the colour-magnitude diagrams of different globular clusters help us in the estimation of their ages by the use of Main-Sequence-Turn-Off (MSTO), which thereby put a minimum bound to the age of the universe. These constraints necessitate dark matter and dark energy in the cosmological models of the universe. The use of colour magnitude diagrams for age calculation comes in addition to two other processes viz., Radioactive Dating and White Dwarf cooling.

This talk has its prime focus on introduction to these three independent ways of age calculation and various discussions regarding the composition and properties of globular clusters. The talk will also emphasize on important applications of globular clusters which include mass estimation of supermassive black holes in galactic centres through velocity dispersion, as well as acting as distance-indicators for distance measurements to external galaxies.

Mriganka and Ankita are students of 3rd Semester of MSc Physics and studies Astrophysics as an elective subject.



September 15, 2017

 Title   Bose-Einstein Condensation - atoms in a lock-step mode
  Speaker Payal Bhattacharjee and Rabin Sen, MSc 3rd Semester, Physics, GU
  Type Student Seminar
  Date Friday, 15 September, 2017
  Time 2:30 PM
  Venue Physics Gallery, GU

Abstract

Perhaps the most mysterious phase of matter is the Bose-Einstein Condensate (BEC). To realise this form of matter was such a tremendous challenge for the scientists that it weren’t created in the laboratory until 1990’s. A Bose-Einstein Condensate is a group of atoms cooled to within a hair of absolute temperature. At this nano Kelvin temperature, the atoms in a Bose-Einstein condensate lose their identical temperatures and behave like “Super atoms”. Bose-Einstein condensates were first predicted in 1924 by an Indian Physicist Satyendranath Bose (1894-1974).

The talk comprises of a brief history of statistical mechanics and Bose-Einstein condensate, its peculiar properties and the statistics which govern these properties. The talk also includes the discovery and realisation of Bose-Einstein Condensate at the laboratory of Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) (the coldest place on Earth). The rest of the talk gives an insight to the applications of Bose-Einstein Condensate in various fields of our daily life.

Payal Bhattacharjee and Rabin Sen are students of 3rd Semester of MSc Physics. 



September 8, 2017


 Title   Small Wonders - a glimpse of the nano world
  Speaker Uday Sharma and Tanushree Ghosh, MSc 3rd Semester, Physics, GU
  Type Student Seminar
  Date Friday, 8 September, 2017
  Time 2:30 PM
  Venue Physics Gallery, GU

Abstract

The technology which manipulates the particles in the dimnensional range of 1nm -100nm, known as nano materials, havs seen tremendous development in the past few decades. The talk contains an introductory idea on what nano materials actually are and how are they developed, and what makes them so special. It contains a brief discussion on quantum dots and their dimensionality showing how it is different from bulk materials (with the help of the famous Brus equation).The optical properties of semiconductor quantum dots (size and shape dependence) will also be discussed in the light of the example of CdSe nanocrystals. The rest of the talk gives an insight to plasmonics (i.e. study of plasmons) and how it has been used in nanophysics to improve the power of solar cells.

Uday Sharma and Tanushree Ghosh are students of 3rd Semesters, MSc Physics and are interested in nano materials